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The Sunday Sketchpad – How to try a different artistic style

eZy Watermark_17-02-2019_06-04-35pm

We all get into our own comfort zones don’t we? However, comfort and familiarity are not places where growth occurs. If you want to grow, learn and get better as an artist, you need to be bold and try something new. My work is normally very detailed and precise in nature. This takes time to create a painting in this way. I also rarely paint nudes.

So, I thought I would challenge myself this Sunday and try painting a nude, in watercolour (not oil) and importantly…in 12 minutes and not 12 hours!

What do you think? It turned out alright really and I might list it on Artfinder and see what happens. Be bold, be brief…be gone!

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The Sunday Sketchpad

I have been playing around with a new idea…I have quite enjoyed doing some pen and wash drawings of PVC and fishnet garments and thought that they might look good in a glossy frame with a glossy mount. This one is a home made effort and just put together for a test. What do you think?

https://artboost.com/c/the-fetish-collection

http://www.artfinder.com/marketing/artwork/lady-darkness-dcaa/?scheme=dark&user_id=1411808&size=large

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The Sunday Sketchpad – How to approach an artist for a commission.

The first step is to find an artist that already paints the genre that you are interested in. For example, if you want a portrait of your dog, then asking an artist that has never painted animals is not going to work so well. You want to love the painting, so the artist needs to have skills in that area…demonstrable via their portfolio of work. Secondly, their painting style is important. I would say, and may be shot down by other artists, that you can ask a fine artist to paint in a more abstract fashion, but not always the other way around. Realistic fine art is a skill separate from other styles and requires years of dedicated self-practice.

Once you have found an artist, look to see what prices they have been charging for their work. If they are selling pieces for £500 they will probably be offended if you ask for a painting for £50. Artists work hard to get their value high and they do this by growing their popularity and demand. You are paying for an artist to sit for hours to create your piece. Even at minimum wage an 12-hour painting would cost you £98.52 next year (2019).

Once you have style, price and genre sorted. You will most likely need to gather some photographic sources of reference for the artist to work from. They will tell you what they need. Then you are all set. Just make sure you allow plenty of time for a first view, to the final piece.

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Sketchpad, Uncategorized

Sunday Sketchpad Why Paint Nudes?

The Moral Reason: The human body, when totally naked, is a remarkable design. When clothes are removed, barriers between people come down. Clothing makes a number of statements about who you are, where you have come from, your social class, your values even. It is entirely a human construct. Without clothes, we struggle to make any judgements at all about people. We all become equal.

The Aesthetic Reason: Another reason I paint, is because I enjoy the structures of muscles and bones and how they look when at peak fitness altogether in a body. The balance and poise of a dancer, the tight abdominals of an athlete.

The Desire Reason: I paint that particular body because I desire to have it myself (or look like I have it) or to touch it. So, in a somewhat goddess-like ambition, I create what I want so I can have it.

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