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Morphing your Artistic Differences

Lilith Rose is my brand, and brands are powerful right? The person writing this is the architect behind Lilith. I am on a journey and I am inviting you to join me.

As we progress as artists, we may well decide that we want to paint something different, that we are no longer just a landscape artist but now want to to be seen as an abstract expert. This is all part of growing. But how does one sell this to the customer base that wants landscapes?

I (the secret architect) have created a number characters that resonate with my deepest self. So, over the next year or two, you will start to see these characters appearing in my work. The lovers of the erotic side of my work will not notice this. But those that come to me through meeting the characters in my magical life, will recognise them. Each will love them for a different reason.

Watch out for Rowena….she is on the canvas. Ruler of Ravens.

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When should an artist try a new style?

Lilith Rose advises on creative stagnation and making sure you capitalise on what is inspiring you at the time.

Art is all about communicating a message. You will have heard of writers block and I am sure as an artist you have experienced artists block. Lilith comments;

“You must always approach your easel with excitement and a clear vision of what you want your piece of art to achieve. If you are not in the mood, it is time to take another route”.

Recently, Lilith has found her gothic and Wiccan interests peaking above the erotic and sensual work she is known for. Musicians are well known to try a different style for a particular album. They have the opportunity to try blues instead of jazz, acoustic instead of electric etc. A visual artist can try different media. Lilith has been drawn more and more to pen and wash and is now working on a piece that uses natural food colouring for her washes. She is incorporating some of her gothic outfits into her work.

Lilith suggests “if a painting starts to bore you, pack it away and move on. I have paintings that I started over ten years ago…one actually is fourteen years old and still not finished!” You can fall back in love with a painting and then complete it. “Or you can break it up and burn it” she adds!

What matters most is that you are creating what inspires you. To your buyers, it can be seen as a special treat if you normally paint landscapes and now you put out a townscape. Lilith comments “a one off piece that is totally different can be seen as far more collectable because it is so different. I am not sure how my buyers would view a painting of an owl when normally they get stockings, but its my gift to them really.”

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The Sunday Sketchpad – How to approach an artist for a commission.

The first step is to find an artist that already paints the genre that you are interested in. For example, if you want a portrait of your dog, then asking an artist that has never painted animals is not going to work so well. You want to love the painting, so the artist needs to have skills in that area…demonstrable via their portfolio of work. Secondly, their painting style is important. I would say, and may be shot down by other artists, that you can ask a fine artist to paint in a more abstract fashion, but not always the other way around. Realistic fine art is a skill separate from other styles and requires years of dedicated self-practice.

Once you have found an artist, look to see what prices they have been charging for their work. If they are selling pieces for £500 they will probably be offended if you ask for a painting for £50. Artists work hard to get their value high and they do this by growing their popularity and demand. You are paying for an artist to sit for hours to create your piece. Even at minimum wage an 12-hour painting would cost you £98.52 next year (2019).

Once you have style, price and genre sorted. You will most likely need to gather some photographic sources of reference for the artist to work from. They will tell you what they need. Then you are all set. Just make sure you allow plenty of time for a first view, to the final piece.

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